Anya Gallaccio

 
 
Friday, Jul 17, 2015-Sunday, Nov 01, 2015
 at
Anya Gallaccio,
forever changes
, 2011, bronze, 39 3/8 x 27 9/16 x 18 1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist; Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam; Blum & Poe, Los Angeles, New York and Tokyo; Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong; and Thomas Dane Gallery, London.
Anya Gallaccio,
remind me to remind me
, 2011, concrete and sand, 16 7/16 x 39 9/16 x 51 in. Courtesy of the artist; Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam; Blum & Poe, Los Angeles, New York and Tokyo; Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong; and Thomas Dane Gallery, London.
Anya Gallaccio,
rhymes of goodbye
, 2011, rock and broken car windshield, 39 3/8 x 27 9/16 x 18 1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist; Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam; Blum & Poe, Los Angeles, New York and Tokyo; Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong; and Thomas Dane Gallery, London.
Anya Gallaccio,
Untitled
. Installation view, Lehmann Maupin, 201 Chrystie Street, New York January 9 - February 15, 2015. Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong. Photo: Elisabeth Bernstein.
Anya Gallaccio,
Installation view of beautiful minds by Anya Gallaccio at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego's Downtown San Diego location
, 2015. Photo by Pablo Mason.

Featured Artists

Past Events

TNT

Thursday, Jul 16, 2015 - 7:00 PM-10:00 PM

Anya Gallaccio is known for installations that employ organic materials that are subject to change and decay—flowers and fruit, sugar and ice—even as her work is inflected with a minimalist vocabulary suggesting durability and timelessness. For this exhibition, Gallaccio worked with students to build an unlikely technology: a 3D printer for clay to render a version of the iconic national monument, Devils Tower. Gallaccio joins a primal art material, clay, with a futuristic innovation, the 3D printer. With this effort, Gallaccio insinuates the slow build of geological time with the immediacy of 3D printing. The 3D printer suggests San Diego’s identity as a hub of technological innovation, even as the form, Devils Tower, possesses otherworldly connotations, as a sacred site in Native American tradition and the location of an alien landing in the 1977 film, Close Encounters of the Third Kind. For Gallaccio, the printer’s extruded coils of wet clay highlight the potential slippage between artistic intent, the limits of materials, and technological processes in contemporary artistic practice.

Gallaccio’s work was first exhibited at MCASD in 1994 as part of inSITE, and has since been presented in numerous international solo exhibitions, at institutions including Tate London (2003); Palazzo delle Papesse, Siena (2005); Sculpture Center, New York (2006); Camden Art Centre, London (2008); and Artpace, San Antonio (2013). Gallaccio will have a forthcoming solo exhibition at MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA. Her work is included in numerous public and private collections, including the Tate London; Victoria & Albert Museum, London; and Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney. A nominee for the prestigious Turner Prize in 2003, the British-born artist is based in San Diego and teaches at the University of California San Diego.

Anya Gallaccio is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by gifts to the annual museum fund. Additional support is provided by Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam, Blum & Poe, Los Angeles, New York & Tokyo, Lehmann Maupin, New York & Hong Kong and Thomas Dane Gallery, London. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.